Step IV – Back construction

So! It’s finally going to happen today, constructing the pattern! I’m quite excited 🙂 Before we start, we need to take the auxiliary measurements we calculated in Step III and add the following standard Ulster allowances:

Measurement name My (auxiliary) measurement
(as calculated here)
Standard addition
for an Ulster coat
Resultant
Rh 22,75 2,5 25,25
Tl 46 2 48
Lg (130)
At 24,25 3 27,25
Rb 19 1 20
Ad 14,25 4 18,25
Hs 7,5 0,5 8
B 21,5 1 22,5
Bau 21,5 1 22,5

Those blue figures are the ones we’ll use from now on.


This following pic shows the steps we will be going through to draw our pattern for the back of the coat. It reads from right to left, and the example shows a pattern for a jacket. It might still be useful for referencing back later:

grundaufstellung_ruecken

Now, let’s get started, then. You’ll need:

  • a ruler
  • pens (preferably of different colours)
  • something to mark a right angle with
  • possibly a calculator 🙂
  • A large (and I mean LARGE) piece of paper, a roll of wallpaper or something

This is what my workspace looks like at the beginning:
workspace

ONE.
Draw your base construction line, at least as long as your coat will be, and an aux line at a right angle, starting at point W.
back01

TWO.
Mark point h, its distance to W equals your Hs. Draw a perpendicular line of 2,5 cm length, ending in point H.
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THREE.
Draw the neckline running from W to H. I used a Burmester curve but it’s mostly just guessing 🙂
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FOUR.
Mark point Rh (at the distance of your Rh from W) on the base line and draw a perpendicular aux line.
back04

FIVE.
Add a third aux line, beginning in point Tl (W-Tl as long as your calculated Tl). Likewise, add a fourth aux line, beginning in Lg (W-Lg as long as the intended length of your coat). This cannot be seen in this picture but will turn up later on.
back05

SIX.
Add point m at a third of the distance from W to Rh.
back06

SEVEN.
Draw point Tl1. It’s 1,5 cm from Tl on the aux line.
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EIGHT.
Now draw a long connecting line from m, running through T1 and your fourth aux line (the one starting at Lg).
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NINE.
In the last step you got point R, where the long center back line cuts across the second aux line.
Now mark point Rb. Its distance from R is your calculated Rb.
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TEN.
Add another aux line that runs parallel to your base line, starting in Rb and creating point b where it hits the first aux line.
back10

ELEVEN.
Draw point a1. It’s 1 cm from b.
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TWELVE.
Draw your shoulder line, beginning at H and going through a1. End the line in point a2 (2,5 cm from a1).
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THIRTEEN.
Mark point s. It’s distance from Rb is 1/4 of the entire length of Rb-b.
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FOURTEEN.
Add a little aux line beginning in s, of 2 cm length, ending in point S.
back15

FIFTEEN.
Add point r. It’s 4 cm from point Rb on the second aux line.
back16

SIXTEEN.
Add another (secondary) aux line, parallel to your base line, beginning in r and cutting across your third aux line (the one starting in Tl). You get point t.
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SEVENTEEN.
1,5 cm from t, mark point T2. (NOTE: I changed this point a bit in the end to adapt it to the Milford)
back19

EIGHTEEN.
Draw the side line, beginning in T2, going through r, ending in S1 (r-S1 measures 4 cm).
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NINETEEN.
Draw your armhole, connecting a2, S and S1. I, again, used a Burmester but it’s still guesswork (as you can see from my none too certain line there…).
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TWENTY.
Draw a aux line at a right angle to the center back line (not the base line!) in such a way that it hits the fourth aux line at the exact distance of your Rb (L1-L2 = Rb). That new point is labelled L2.
back22

TWENTY-ONE.
Sorry about the blurry pic. Fortunately this step is easy: Connect T2 and L2 by a straight line.
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TWENTY-TWO.
Mark the belt lines. The original Milford’s belt is 7 cm across, so I drew two lines, 3,5 cm off, on either side of the third aux line.
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TWENTY-THREE.
Mark the end of the belt halves at 12 cm from T1.
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TWENTY-FOUR.
Another not really brilliant pic, showing the back pattern in total. We’ll mark the pleats, and make some little adaptations in the next step!
back26

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